This bibliography is taken from the booklet "The relevance of intestinal microbiota for prevention and therapy". It is provided by nutrimmun with friendly support.

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by Barbara MH Stöckigta, Florian Bescha, Florian Jeserichab, Christine Holmbergac, Claudia M Wittad and Michael Teut

aInstitute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, Charite Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; bCatholic Academy “Die Wolfsburg”, Muelheim, Ruhr, Germany; cBerlin School of Public Health, Charite Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; dInstitute for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, University of Zurich and University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Contemporary spiritual healers in Germany are a heterogeneous and growing group. While some healing techniques have a long history in Germany, they have become more and more diverse over the last decades (Habermann 1995; Binder and Wolf-Braun 1995).

Today they can be built on religious traditions such as Christianity, from various spiritual practices from different cultures and healing concepts (e.g. chakras, reiki), but also from explanatory concepts in physics (e.g. quantum healing) (Voss 2011). In Germany, current healers have either a background as medical professionals or ‘Heilpraktiker’ or have no medical/CAM background at all.

A German ‘Heilpraktiker’ is a non-medical practitionerswith an education in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Medical and healing activities, which include diagnosis and treatment of specific illnesses, are only allowed to be practised by physicians or ‘Heilpraktiker’. In 2004, the German Federal Constitutional Court made it lawful to practice spiritual healing as non-medical consulting for the purpose of activating patients’ self-healing powers. Spiritual healing does not replace diagnosis or treatment by a physician or by a ‘Heilpraktiker’.

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Author: Blödt S1, Pach D, Kaster T, Lüdke R, Reishauer A, Witt CM.
Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany

BACKGROUND:
The value of qigong in the treatment of chronic low back pain is unclear. In a randomized controlled trial, we evaluated whether qigong is non-inferior to exercise therapy in patients with chronic low back pain.

October 2015 

1. What do you consider as red meat?

Red meat refers to all mammalian muscle meat, including, beef, veal, pork, lamb, mutton, horse, and goat.

2. What do you consider as processed meat?

Processed meat refers to meat that has been transformed through salting, curing, fermentation, smoking, or other processes to enhance flavour or improve preservation. Most processed meats contain pork or beef, but processed meats may also contain other red meats, poultry, offal, or meat by-products such as blood. Examples of processed meat include hot dogs (frankfurters), ham, sausages, corned beef, and biltong or beef jerky as well as canned meat and meat-based preparations and sauces.

by Mariateresa Tassinari MPhil, PhD Candidate1 and Paolo Roberti di Sarsina MD2,3
1Member, 2President, Charity for Person Centred Medicine-Moral Entity, Bologna, Italy, 3Researcher, Observatory and Methods for Health, Department of Sociology and Social Research, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy

From the moment that evidence-based medicine (EBM) was accepted by the predominant medical-scientific community, it has increasingly represented a refuge for medicine, which has voluntarily chosen to regard the validity of a theory and the truth in the same way. The introduction of placebo in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) serves as such [1]; in order to analyse the reality by dividing it into two poles, the true and the false and, by tertium non datur principle, effectively excluding any other possibility.

All of this was legitimized by means of a methodic rigour, which not only excluded but also deprived value, resulting in everything that was either impossible to measure or standardize as unjustifiable [2]. If this measure of purification has permitted important and useful discoveries, it has, on the other hand, also deprived medical practice of a vision which does not fit into a characteristically pharmaceutical-centred one; for the present circumstances, the certainties on which that paradigm is based are weakening and creak like the floor upon which Ptolemy founded his theory.